Tag Archives: ancestors

Autumn – Stanza 15

burst forth in salutations for these pious few of note
grace, humility, compassion stirred their hearts and
souls; some were royal born, some were royal wed,
a full life they all lived then to the nunnery they fled
sainted, miracles post-death, their legacies are legend

~kat

For Jane Dougherty’s Daily Stanza Challenge.

In my ancestry searches, I’ve come across several saints in my family tree. These are the women saints that I have discovered so far. It was not uncommon for women of royalty to take an interest in charitable work and building abbeys throughout Europe. Once their children were grown and their husbands gone (for they often outlived them) these ladies would “get thee to a nunnery”…or as the records show, they would retire to the abbeys they had built. Sainthood was always bestowed upon them posthumously, as witnesses began to report miracles associated with them. Above are the pictures of my great-greats who left such a legacy.

St Helena (b249-d330) 57th Great
St Dode Clothilde (b490-d540) 48th Great
St Itta (b592-d693) 45th Great
St Marie (b605-d677) 45th Great
St Begga (b613-d692) 44th Great
St Irmina (b650-d706) 44th Great
St Elgiva (b922-d944) 36th Great
St Margaret Atheling (b1045-d1093) 35th Great


Autumn – Stanza 13

kin can be elusive, notorious in fact with
legacies to be recalled by generations hence
more curious than how they lived, accounts
of how they died, some of causes natural
while others met the sword midst battle cries

~kat

For Jane Dougherty’s Daily Stanza Challenge.

I have found that records of how my ancestors died can be an interesting window into the times that they lived. I discovered the obituary for my 3rd Great Grandfather, Henry Orwick. Henry was born on the 2nd of July 1833 in Virginia. He married my 3rd Great Grandmother, Malinda C. Martin, in Indiana on 10 May 1855 and from census records it appears that they made their home in Indiana, where they lived for the rest of their lives.  Henry served in the Union Army, when he was 30 years old, in the 144th Regiment, Indiana Infantry. The 1864 United States Census records that Henry was a Hog Farmer, having slaughtered in excess of 100 lbs of the beasts that year.  Henry and Malinda had 5 or six children. My great great grandmother, Amanda was born in 1874. But it was Henry’s death that caused quite a stir. Here is the excerpt of his obituary,  found by a distant cousin (I assume) at the Cordyn, Indiana Library. It may actually be the most interesting thing about this common man who I call great, great, great…

Sudden Death of Henry Orwick

Henry Orwick, of Leavenworth, died suddenly at that place last Monday. He had been deputed to serve attachment papers against a steamboat tying at that place, and while holding the line attached to the boat, he was seen to throw up his hands and fall backward.  It was, at first thought he had been shot, but it was afterward learned that he had died of heart failure.

 

 


August – Stanza 12

tree strong, sure, with roots meandering deep
elusive broken chains, some stories silenced,
ever undisturbed, to sleep between the lines
of history’s pages, glimmers only glimpsed
by those remembering, distant reminiscing kin

~kat

For Jane Dougherty’s August Stanza Challenge.


I had a thrilling find on my father’s side of the family tree this past week! A photo posted on ancestry by someone who is likely a distant cousin of mine, of my great, great grandparents August Vilhelm Johansson, his wife, Charlotta Sofia and their children take before the family emigrated to America from Sweden in 1903. I’m guessing the young girl leaning against her mother’s knee is my great grandmother, Hanna Bernhardina Johnson (surname obviously Americanized). Along with the photo I was also able to discover another link in the root of this side of my tree: the names of Charlotta’s parents, my great, great, great grandparents, Carl Gustaf Giesche and Helena Sophia, née: Martensdr. That is where the story ends for now…to be continued. 😊


August – Stanza 11

fellow genealogists would certainly agree
that finding distant relatives, a generation,
maybe two, or if you’re lucky, three’s a testament
that most of us will fade into obscurity, i must
admit a lucky thread runs through my family tree

~kat

For Jane Dougherty’s Stanza a Day Challenge. Taking a breather today from royal name dropping. Royals are like cockroaches. If you find one, there are dozens more hidden between the cracks. Mostly because there are scarce records kept on common folk like me and…I won’t presume to speak for you… 😊 What records that may exist are often locked away in dusty church archives…baptisms, marriages, deaths…like the one I have pictured here. It is the burial record of my 15th great grandmother, Joan Pilford, born in 1536 in Braunton, Devon, England, to John Pylforde (surnames often changed generation to generation) and Joan Thorougood. She married Walter Wyatt in 1556 and had one child, a daughter, Margaret (my 14th great) in 1569. Joan died in 1589. She was here for a blip and then gone but for a few blots of ink on fading pages, in tomes piled high in dusty archives. I think I relate more to old Joan than many of our more notorious greats. But it is kind of cool to know they’re out there. 😉


Autumn – Stanza 10

hair of red, and a rotten tooth of blue, Harald,
son of Gorm the Old, he built a bridge or two
one the oldest, longest known in Scandinavia’s
Ravning meadow; the other ‘tween the Danes and
Norse; hence ended by his bastard son, poor fellow

~kat

For Jane Dougherty’s August Stanza Challenge.

My 35th Great Grandfather, Harold “Bluetooth” is remembered for bridging the divide between the Danes and Norwegians when he became king of both countries and also for his “miracle” conversion hence, bringing Christianity to the pagans of Denmark. Though I’ve read it would take some time before his countrymen came on board. His nickname became the inspiration for our modern wireless Bluetooth technology. Now you know. Next time you pop a wireless earbud in your ear, you’ll think of Harald I’m thinking. 😊


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