Category Archives: Poetry

Oviellejo 23 & 24 – up in smoke

we should care that Gaia’s burning
it’s occurring

a thousand miles or more away
while leaders play

at governing to sate their glut
when is enough ever enough

what will it take to wake us up
as our great treasures slowly die
underneath gray smoke-choked skies
it’s occurring while leaders play, when is enough ever enough

~~~

meanwhile children rot in cages
hate’s contagious

others still, gunned down in schools
amendments rule

squandering our greatest treasures
all for pleasure

sins egregious, without measure
vain thoughts and prayers fall on deaf ears
for their small god’s been dead for years
hate’s contagious, amendments rule, all for pleasure

~kat


The Oviellejo is an Old Spanish verse form (derived from ovillo, a ball of yarn). A stanza consists of 10 lines, with a rhyme scheme of AABBCCCDDC. The second line of each rhyme scheme, Line 2,4,6, is short line of up to 5 syllables. The last line is a “redondilla,” a “little round” that collects all three of the short lines.


Oviellejo #22

earth’s a ball of crackling clay
in disarray

temperature are rising higher
we’re on fire

though fools deny it’s all a hoax
it’s not a joke

hope for the future up in smoke
from green and lush to ash to dust
before it’s too late, change, we must
in disarray, we’re on fire…it’s not a joke

~kat


The Oviellejo is an Old Spanish verse form (derived from ovillo, a ball of yarn). A stanza consists of 10 lines, with a rhyme scheme of AABBCCCDDC. The second line of each rhyme scheme, Line 2,4,6, is short line of up to 5 syllables. The last line is a “redondilla,” a “little round” that collects all three of the short lines.


Oviellejo #21

renaissance

there’s still some brokenness in me
others can’t see

crazy missteps and little deaths
the depth and breath

of every choice I’ve made, and yet
I can’t forget

there’s little time for vain regret
even in failure there’s a light
guiding my steps to get things right
others can’t see, the depth and breath I can’t forget

~kat


The Oviellejo is an Old Spanish verse form (derived from ovillo, a ball of yarn). A stanza consists of 10 lines, with a rhyme scheme of AABBCCCDDC. The second line of each rhyme scheme, Line 2,4,6, is short line of up to 5 syllables. The last line is a “redondilla,” a “little round” that collects all three of the short lines.


Oviellejo #20

a single bloom ‘midst bristled brush
rooted in dust

her periwinkle petals fade
in want of shade

what beautiful audacity
tenacity

that even in adversity
she smiles at the blistering sun
refusing to become undone
rooted in dust, in want of shade…tenacity

~kat


The Oviellejo is an Old Spanish verse form (derived from ovillo, a ball of yarn). A stanza consists of 10 lines, with a rhyme scheme of AABBCCCDDC. The second line of each rhyme scheme, Line 2,4,6, is short line of up to 5 syllables. The last line is a “redondilla,” a “little round” that collects all three of the short lines.


Monday with the Muse

bend in the road

photo courtesy of shrutikhanna at Pixabay.com

the bend in the road

at the bend where
the roadside devours
the dust of summer
we carry with us days
to hold in our hands;
to live as if death
were impossible

~kat


A Blackout poem inspired by today’s poem of the day at PoetryFoundation.org by Li-Young Lee, “From Blossoms”.

From Blossoms
BY LI-YOUNG LEE

From blossoms comes
this brown paper bag of peaches
we bought from the boy
at the bend in the road where we turned toward
signs painted Peaches.

From laden boughs, from hands,
from sweet fellowship in the bins,
comes nectar at the roadside, succulent
peaches we  devour, dusty skin and all,
comes the familiar dust of summer, dust we eat.

O, to take what we love inside,
to carry within us an orchard, to eat
not only the skin, but the shade,
not only the sugar, but the days, to hold
the fruit in our hands, adore it, then bite into
the round jubilance of peach.

There are days we live
as if death were nowhere
in the background; from joy
to joy to joy, from wing to wing,
from blossom to blossom to
impossible blossom, to sweet impossible blossom.

Li-Young Lee, “From Blossoms” from Rose. Copyright © 1986 by Li-Young Lee. Reprinted with the permission of BOA Editions Ltd., http://www.boaeditions.org. Source: Rose (BOA Editions Ltd., 1986)


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