Monday with the Muse

bend in the road

photo courtesy of shrutikhanna at Pixabay.com

the bend in the road

at the bend where
the roadside devours
the dust of summer
we carry with us days
to hold in our hands;
to live as if death
were impossible

~kat


A Blackout poem inspired by today’s poem of the day at PoetryFoundation.org by Li-Young Lee, “From Blossoms”.

From Blossoms
BY LI-YOUNG LEE

From blossoms comes
this brown paper bag of peaches
we bought from the boy
at the bend in the road where we turned toward
signs painted Peaches.

From laden boughs, from hands,
from sweet fellowship in the bins,
comes nectar at the roadside, succulent
peaches we  devour, dusty skin and all,
comes the familiar dust of summer, dust we eat.

O, to take what we love inside,
to carry within us an orchard, to eat
not only the skin, but the shade,
not only the sugar, but the days, to hold
the fruit in our hands, adore it, then bite into
the round jubilance of peach.

There are days we live
as if death were nowhere
in the background; from joy
to joy to joy, from wing to wing,
from blossom to blossom to
impossible blossom, to sweet impossible blossom.

Li-Young Lee, “From Blossoms” from Rose. Copyright © 1986 by Li-Young Lee. Reprinted with the permission of BOA Editions Ltd., http://www.boaeditions.org. Source: Rose (BOA Editions Ltd., 1986)


Oviellejo #19 -a tangled web

a tangled web

a crazed arachnid haunts my porch
amidst the scorch

of sweltering late summer days
shrouded in haze

the remnant of a tepid rain
nothing remains

but eerie signs of the deranged
exposed too long to heat and blight
who crave the lunacy of night
amidst the scorch, shrouded in haze, nothing remains

~kat


The Oviellejo is an Old Spanish verse form (derived from ovillo, a ball of yarn). A stanza consists of 10 lines, with a rhyme scheme of AABBCCCDDC. The second line of each rhyme scheme, Line 2,4,6, is short line of up to 5 syllables. The last line is a “redondilla,” a “little round” that collects all three of the short lines.


Oviellejo #18

kintsugi

one does not live to three-score-three
with unskinned knees

silver peppered, thinning locks
life’s hard knocks

eventually take their toll
don’t always show

a life lived well, the afterglow,
magnificence, adorned in grace,
deep wisdom etched into a face
with unskinned knees, life’s hard knocks don’t always show

~kat


The philosophy behind Kintsugi is a confluence of three very potent rivers of thought from Asian Philosophy. Zen, Mono No Aware, and Wabi Sabi come together as one in the art of Kintsugi to teach us about impermanence and imperfection. Repair requires transformation and that cracks hold a philosophical merit and significance all on their own.

Zen emphasizes zazen: meditation as the means to awakening. Zen meditation ideally is not only concentration, but also awareness: being aware of the continuing changes in our consciousness, of all our sensations and our automatic reactions.

Read more HERE.


The Oviellejo is an Old Spanish verse form (derived from ovillo, a ball of yarn). A stanza consists of 10 lines, with a rhyme scheme of AABBCCCDDC. The second line of each rhyme scheme, Line 2,4,6, is short line of up to 5 syllables. The last line is a “redondilla,” a “little round” that collects all three of the short lines.


Sunday’s Week in ReVerse – 18 August 2019

My partner told me that I have taken up humming lately. I hadn’t noticed. It’s an annoying habit that crops up when I am feeling stressed or overwhelmed. Too many hours at work is a likely catalyst. And undoubtedly, a family gathering this weekend, attended by a daughter and granddaughters I haven’t seen since the ‘great divide’ that has broken so many friends and families in recent years. It went better than I expected, but there was the sad, black hole of those lost years; an awkward, lost ease, the familiarity that comes through unbroken connection. Still I will cherish the brief memory of our time together. A mother is always a mother, even if her children fly away, never to return or for only brief glimpses.

There was also our first attempts at taming the shrew out of the feral, frightened kitten we rescued. It’s amazing how little time it takes in the wild to snap a tiny, innocent kitten into a snarling, claw-wielding devil. But I am committed to see it through. His mom is scheduled for her spay this Thursday. I hope all goes well. She was loved once, then cast aside I assume for whatever reason people do such things. I can tell she remembers warm and safe in the way she waits for me and rubs against me purring when I feed her. I know how she feels. How easy it is to forgive…forget even…life’s harshness.

Mothers, children, family, cats and kittens…the reason I work to survive here for just a moment more of the blessings of this life. I hope you have moments this week that cause you to pause and think, ‘life is good’…because life is.

Sunday’s Week in ReVerse – 18 August 2019

be kind to others you don’t know
when children lose their innocence
she had some wild stories
with dreams that linger into day
you must be red, rose red like me, you can’t be blue
we can’t ignore that we are doomed; let’s set things right
a storm is nigh, rain droplets burst, cool is the breeze
in the belly of grace I fall
amidst the trees, sparks of divine on breezes sway

~kat


A ReVerse poem is a summary poem with a single line lifted from each entry of a collection of work over a particular timeframe and re-penned in chronological order as a new poem. Unlike a collaborative poem, the ReVerse features the words of one writer, providing a glimpse into their thoughts over time. I use it as a review of the previous week.


Oviellejo #17

for nemophilists such as me
amidst the trees

is where my wild heart can find
sparks of divine

deeply rooted in fecund clay
on breezes sway

leaves a flutter at heaven’s gate
cradling fledglings nest to wing
cool shade for seekers wandering
amidst the trees, sparks of divine on breezes sway

~kat

Inspired by today’s Grandiloquent word of the Day…


The Oviellejo is an Old Spanish verse form (derived from ovillo, a ball of yarn). A stanza consists of 10 lines, with a rhyme scheme of AABBCCCDDC. The second line of each rhyme scheme, Line 2,4,6, is short line of up to 5 syllables. The last line is a “redondilla,” a “little round” that collects all three of the short lines.


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