Tag Archives: nature

Magnetic Monday – Sunflowers

sunflowers

Sunflowers

come spring, we’ll toss
sunflower seeds over the
wild grassy edge of our
beautiful sanctuary, daffodils
and roses too, along
the forest path…for in
a world so troubled,
there must always be
blossoms, sweet, blooming to
soften the darkest of nights,
if only for a season

~kat


Working my way back into the groove. Monday’s are for Magnetic Poetry and dalliances with the Muse. True story…we did pick up several packages of flower seeds over the weekend, to be sowed in a few weeks, come spring.


Cinqku #22

hush, be
still my heart,
dawns first light, bright,
through tree leaves, on the breeze
dancing

~kat


A cinqku must always have 5 lines and a perfect seventeen-syllable count. The lines typically follow a 2,3,4,6,2 format. There is no title requirement on the second line. As for syntax and diction styles, it follows the free Tanka style originally. There are no metric requirements for a cinqku poem. Additionally, the final line must contain a cinquain or kireji turn for emphasis. 


Kimo – Day 14

…just another summer day

simmering humidity, hot, thin air,
clouds hang in the breezeless sky,
low, gray, hoarding raindrops

~kat


Kimo poems are an Israeli version of haikqApparently, there was a need for more syllables in Hebrew. That said, most of the rules are still familiar:
• 3 lines.
• No rhymes.
• 10 syllables in the first line, 7 in the second, and 6 in the third.

Also, the kimo is focused on a single frozen image (kind of like a snapshot). So it’s uncommon to have any movement happening in kimo poems.


Kimo Days 12 – 13

i shall never grow weary of the greens
the blues and the golden hues
of summer in full bloom

nor tire of listening to songbirds
frogs, crickets and cicadas,
the rain pitapatting

~kat


Kimo poems are an Israeli version of haiku. Apparently, there was a need for more syllables in Hebrew. That said, most of the rules are still familiar:
• 3 lines.
• No rhymes.
• 10 syllables in the first line, 7 in the second, and 6 in the third.

Also, the kimo is focused on a single frozen image (kind of like a snapshot). So it’s uncommon to have any movement happening in kimo poems.


Kimo Day 11

the air smells of fish and algae, a lake
is hovering in the clouds…
come, let’s swim in the rain

~kat


Kimo poems are an Israeli version of haiku. Apparently, there was a need for more syllables in Hebrew. That said, most of the rules are still familiar:
• 3 lines.
• No rhymes.
• 10 syllables in the first line, 7 in the second, and 6 in the third.

Also, the kimo is focused on a single frozen image (kind of like a snapshot). So it’s uncommon to have any movement happening in kimo poems.


%d bloggers like this: