Category Archives: nature

döstädning

döstädning

I am a tree in autumn,
limbs stiffening from
dawn’s first frost,
clinging wistfully to
the dying remnants of
summer, old photographs,
books, trinkets, effigies
of a life lived long and
full, roots deeply
entrenched in the
familiar, yielding to
the wind whispering, it is
time to let go, to render
to yesterday its relics,
to turn the brittle page
in naked abandon, to rest
my soul in the cool present,
to sleep, to dream of
another glorious spring

~kat


Döstädning, which means “death cleaning” in English, is a method of downsizing and organizing from the Swedish author and artist Margareta Magnusson. Death cleaning isn’t about getting rid of all your stuff, but rather streamlining your life so you’re only holding onto what makes you happy.

I am moving from my big two story home in a month into a sweet little one level home on a hill in foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Hence, I’ve been a little less prolific in my writing here, obviously preoccupied with the details of moving. I am hoping my daughters appreciate my efforts to leave a smaller footprint for them to dispose of when I’m gone. And as for the years I have left (which I hope are many) I am excited to begin a new, simpler chapter. Peace!

Here’s my new view…


Cinqku #22

hush, be
still my heart,
dawns first light, bright,
through tree leaves, on the breeze
dancing

~kat


A cinqku must always have 5 lines and a perfect seventeen-syllable count. The lines typically follow a 2,3,4,6,2 format. There is no title requirement on the second line. As for syntax and diction styles, it follows the free Tanka style originally. There are no metric requirements for a cinqku poem. Additionally, the final line must contain a cinquain or kireji turn for emphasis. 


Cinqku #8

When the temperatures start to cool I can count on a few of these unwelcome visitors finding a way into my house. Now I’ve been known to get up close and personal with spiders (non-poisonous varieties) watching them for hours spin and dangle from their webs. I’m not afraid of snakes, frogs or lizards. But these monsters terrify me. They are called camel or cave crickets, aka, spider crickets, mutant crickets, criders and sprickets. Now they do not make an annoying chirping noise like their cousins. No. It’s even more horrible!!! If you happen to make eye contact with them, they will consider you a predator and jump on you! How terrifying is that?!?! Needless to say, these vermin will send me squealing, seeking shelter! I saw my first one this evening in our mud room on the wall…it must be fall!

(Of course the photo below was not taken by me…do I look crazy?!) 😳 photo credit goes to the professionals at Russell’s Pest Control.

terror
comes calling
every fall
leaping spider crickets
sprickets

~kat


A cinqku must always have 5 lines and a perfect seventeen-syllable count. The lines typically follow a 2,3,4,6,2 format. There is no title requirement on the second line. As for syntax and diction styles, it follows the free Tanka style originally. There are no metric requirements for a cinqku poem. Additionally, the final line must contain a cinquain or kireji turn for emphasis. 


Oviellejo #22

earth’s a ball of crackling clay
in disarray

temperature are rising higher
we’re on fire

though fools deny it’s all a hoax
it’s not a joke

hope for the future up in smoke
from green and lush to ash to dust
before it’s too late, change, we must
in disarray, we’re on fire…it’s not a joke

~kat


The Oviellejo is an Old Spanish verse form (derived from ovillo, a ball of yarn). A stanza consists of 10 lines, with a rhyme scheme of AABBCCCDDC. The second line of each rhyme scheme, Line 2,4,6, is short line of up to 5 syllables. The last line is a “redondilla,” a “little round” that collects all three of the short lines.


Oviellejo #17

for nemophilists such as me
amidst the trees

is where my wild heart can find
sparks of divine

deeply rooted in fecund clay
on breezes sway

leaves a flutter at heaven’s gate
cradling fledglings nest to wing
cool shade for seekers wandering
amidst the trees, sparks of divine on breezes sway

~kat

Inspired by today’s Grandiloquent word of the Day…


The Oviellejo is an Old Spanish verse form (derived from ovillo, a ball of yarn). A stanza consists of 10 lines, with a rhyme scheme of AABBCCCDDC. The second line of each rhyme scheme, Line 2,4,6, is short line of up to 5 syllables. The last line is a “redondilla,” a “little round” that collects all three of the short lines.


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