Tag Archives: Autumn

equinox

Equinox 

1-
the day and gloam meet
subtle wafts of musky air,
leaves, weary of summer heat
crisp, clinging tight where
parched sap chokes mid-limb, no life to spare

2-
pencils freshly sharp
notes of soft wood, shaved lead, tools
of learning the three R’s, art,
notebooks, college-ruled
students, masked, head anxiously to school

3-
pumpkin that and this,
ad nauseam, morning brew
concoctions promising bliss
at a price, it’s new
again, some wait all year, sad but true

4-
blink and time is gone
soft body, aching, graying,
dreams unrealized, nights long
and dark, days fading
winter coming soon, too soon, just saying

5-
another harvest
wisdom gleaned from books and tears
choose your poison, leave the rest
the death we most fear…
not living life full while we are here

~kat
A new form, to me at least, lured me from hiding…actually, forced me from what has become the chaos of surviving. I paired it with my own creation, the horatiodet. Ode to my favorite season. 

The cadralor is a poem of 5, unrelated, numbered stanzaic images, each of which can stand alone as a poem, is fewer than 10 lines, and ideally constrains all stanzas to the same number of lines. Imagery is crucial to cadralore: each stanza should be a whole, imagist poem, almost like a scene from a film, or a photograph. The fifth stanza acts as the crucible, alchemically pulling the unrelated stanzas together into a love poem. By “love poem,” we mean that your fifth stanza illuminates a gleaming thread that runs obliquely through the unrelated stanzas and answers the compelling question: “For what do you yearn?”
gogyoka

Horatiodet is a total of 5 lines, syllable count: 5-7-7-5-9 / rhyme scheme: ababb. In other words, it is a short Horatian Ode (only one stanza), a form based on the style of Horace, Quintus Horatius Flaccus (December 8, 65 BC – November 27, 8 BC), the leading Roman lyric poet.

homecoming

homecoming

soaking the treetops

aflame in red, amber, gold,

cool rain in autumn

cannot quench the fading leaves

but softs the loam to tend them

~kat


A Tanka for Colleen’s Tanka Tuesday.


apple cider sunset

apple cider sunset

leaves droop drearily on exposed branches
tinged amber from the sun’s fierce fading,
fire-red on the horizon at dusk of day,
the autumnal equinox is upon us, crisp and cool,
apple cider, cinnamon steeped, nips my tongue

~kat


A Gogyohka for Colleen Cheesebro’s Tanka Tuesday Challenge.


döstädning

döstädning

I am a tree in autumn,
limbs stiffening from
dawn’s first frost,
clinging wistfully to
the dying remnants of
summer, old photographs,
books, trinkets, effigies
of a life lived long and
full, roots deeply
entrenched in the
familiar, yielding to
the wind whispering, it is
time to let go, to render
to yesterday its relics,
to turn the brittle page
in naked abandon, to rest
my soul in the cool present,
to sleep, to dream of
another glorious spring

~kat


Döstädning, which means “death cleaning” in English, is a method of downsizing and organizing from the Swedish author and artist Margareta Magnusson. Death cleaning isn’t about getting rid of all your stuff, but rather streamlining your life so you’re only holding onto what makes you happy.

I am moving from my big two story home in a month into a sweet little one level home on a hill in foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Hence, I’ve been a little less prolific in my writing here, obviously preoccupied with the details of moving. I am hoping my daughters appreciate my efforts to leave a smaller footprint for them to dispose of when I’m gone. And as for the years I have left (which I hope are many) I am excited to begin a new, simpler chapter. Peace!

Here’s my new view…


Cinqku #23 – A Trio in Honor of August

notus

son of
the stars and
dawn, Notus* drives
the swelling south winds of
autumn

laying
bare summer’s
bones, the reaper’s
sickle, sparing none this
harvest

season
letting go
drawing inward,
many blessings to be
counted

~kat
*NOTOS (Notus) was the god of the south wind, one of the four directional Anemoi (WindGods). He was the wet, storm-bringing wind of late summer and early autumn. Notos dwelt in Aithiopia (Ethiopia), the southernmost realm in the geographies of myth.


A cinqku must always have 5 lines and a perfect seventeen-syllable count. The lines typically follow a 2,3,4,6,2 format. There is no title requirement on the second line. As for syntax and diction styles, it follows the free Tanka style originally. There are no metric requirements for a cinqku poem. Additionally, the final line must contain a cinquain or kireji turn for emphasis. 

 


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