Tag Archives: Friday Fictioneers

Kentucky Fried

Haven’t done one of these in a while. Here is a 99-word historic fiction story inspired by the photo below by © Ted Strutz as part of Rochelle Wisoff-Fields’ Friday Fictioneers flash fiction challenge.

PHOTO PROMPT © Ted Strutz

Kentucky Fried

A foul-mouthed, hot-tempered son of an Indiana farmer, Harland dropped out of school at age 12, leaving home a year later. He held many jobs: farmer, streetcar conductor, soldier, railroad fireman, lawyer, insurance salesman, steamboat operator, secretary, lighting manufacturer, amateur midwife, hotel owner and restaurateur.

But it was in retirement, that Harland found fame. On a social security income of only $105 a month, he hit the road, armed with his secret recipe, pressure fryer, and a fire extinguisher to sell franchises, sleeping in his car between appointments. He would tell you that his life was “finger lickin’ good.”

~kat

You probably recognize this spicy fellow as “The Colonel”, aka Colonel Harland David Sanders (September 9, 1890 – December 16, 1980) of KFC fame. His story just goes to show you, it’s never too late to make your mark in this world. Click HERE to learn a few interesting facts about this American icon.



The Inheritance

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PHOTO PROMPT © J Hardy Carroll

“I like it there. It fits in nicely with the decor, don’t you think?”

Charles laughed, “If you say so, dear! Every home should have a 12th century gothic relic.”

“Don’t laugh!” It is the only thing I have of value from my parents. It’s been in the family for centuries. I’m not selling it in the estate sale!”

“That’s probably a good thing Diane. I doubt it would bring much at auction with that “Made In China” stamp on the bottom.”

“What? Let me see! Oh my god!”

“Sorry Diane. You’re right though. It looks great on that wall.”

~kat

100 words for Rochelle Wisoff-Fields Friday Fictioneers Flash Fiction Photo Prompt Challenge, inspired by the photo by © J Hardy Carroll above.


Hush-A-Bye

Photo by Gah Learner

Sarah knew that moments like this were precious. She didn’t mind the late nights, especially when the breeze was cool and the moon was full.

Holding her in her lap rocking was a peaceful time even on those nights when she was fussy and fretful. Sarah just kept rocking. Sometimes she would sing her favorite song to help her drift back to sleep. She slept more often these days. Her frail body eaten away by cancer.

Once upon a time ‘twas her mom who rocked her to sleep on nights like this.

“I love you mama. Close your eyes now.”

~kat

100 Words for Friday Fictioneers inspired by this photo by © Gah Learner.


Sweet Tea and Wheat Fields

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Photo Prompt by © Ronda Del Boccio

While Hanna loved living in the city, she never forgot her roots, growing up on a sprawling wheat farm in the country. Whenever she got homesick, she poured herself a tall glass of sweet tea, tucked the old quilt her grandmother gave her under her arm, and headed to her tiny porch twenty stories up. There she spread the quilt on the steel slab and sat cross-legged, watching the breeze toss the tall green stalks she had transplanted on the porch ledge. Some city folks pot bright flowers in their concrete spaces. Not Hanna. Her planters were tiny wheat fields.

~kat

100 Words for Friday Fictioneers inspired by this photo prompt by © Ronda Del Boccio.

 


The Surprise

“How much farther?”

“Just a few more steps Gran. Don’t peek!”

“Well how can I, when you’ve got me blindfolded! Honestly, what is this about?”

“You’ll see!” the two lads chimed. After Pops died they wanted to do something nice for their dear old Gran. They’d located her girlhood friend. She was waiting at the dockside restaurant.

“We’re here!!” the oldest exclaimed, while the younger removed the blindfold.

Gran squinted past their beaming faces at the woman sitting before them.

“You!!!! You old bitch!”

The boys’ hearts sank.

“God, I’ve missed you!” Gran cried as she embraced her old friend.

~kat

100 Words for Friday Fictioneers inspired by this photo by © Ted Strutz


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